DONATE AND BECOME ONE OF THE BABY PRIMATE GUARDIANS

 

 

 

  

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BE A GUARDIAN OF A BABY PRIMATE at the Endangered Primate Rescue Center. Our goal is to raise a total of 700 US$ for each of the baby primates at the EPRC before the end of 2018, which is the average cost per year to give them the best attention they need.  By co-sponsoring one of the baby primates your name will be (optionally) listed on the online profile of the baby you are safeguarding and we will also send you an online certification of adoption

At the Endangered Primate Rescue Center each successfully rescued or bred primate is a true miracle for both the animal and ourselves, as it will contribute to the survival of their species. However, we need to rely on the generosity of donors and sponsors whose contribution will help pay for the enormous ongoing expense it takes to commit to this mission. By reaching the set fundraising goals we will be able to fully cover food, enrichment, medicines, veterinary care, cage maintenance and rehabilitation of the babies. This would allow us re-orient the limited available funding towards other projects that would further ensure the survival of these endangered primate species such as environmental education and the protection of their forests.

Scroll down to have a closer look at the currently listed baby primates and get to know them a bit better

 

Support Beo

$46 of $700 raised
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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10

Beo is a red-shanked douc langur and is a bit less than a year old. His name means “Fatty” because after being rescued by the EPRC, his figure has gained quite a few grams in a short time. Beo was found in Nam Dong (Hue), Central Vietnam, which is 650 km away from our center in Cuc Phuong (Ninh Binh). We heard that some local people accidentally discovered him alone in the forest before they reported to the ranger force. However, based on our experience, there's very little chance a baby langur let go of his/her mom and the other way around. Most of the cases, hunters kill the mom and sell the baby as a pet. 

Support Kitty

$0 of $700 raised
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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10

We think that Kitty is a silvered langur, but we are still not sure to which type of silvered langur she belongs.  She is very well-behaved as she doesn't cry too much when the "mothers"(animal-keepers) are not there. She always finishes her milk and recently she even started to eat a lot of leaves! And as goes a favourite quote of animal keepers: 'Her 💩 is perfect!'. She is a healthy little girl and we hope for her a long and happy future. Your support will create a world of difference for Kitty and members of her species.

Support Django

$200 of $700 raised
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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10

Django is a baby from Willy and Mia. He was born at the EPRC in March 2017, so he is almost a year old. It's the second baby for this couple. They were very neglectful and impatient with their first baby, but they have learned to be much better parents with Django. Willy, Mia and Django are Hatinh langurs and are part of a successful breeding and reintroduction program. Several Hatinh langurs born at the EPRC have been recently reintroduced back into the wild, more specifically in Kẻ Gỗ Nature Reserve, in Hatinh province. They are still under full time protection by specially trained rangers, but we hope that one day these beautiful and intelligent creatures will be able to live in all peace without the permanent threat of being killed or captured alive by humans.

Support Milo

$0 of $700 raised
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Personal Info

Donation Total: $10

Milo  was reported in Kon Tum province in Central Vietnam and arrived at the EPRC in September 2017. Someone reported to have accidentally found her alone in the forest, but as often occurs, the exact details about her background remains blurry. Interestingly, her name originates from the fact that she would only accept to drink Milo milk, which is a famous brand that has milk with chocolate. However, she eventually got rid of her bad habits by gradually decreasing the amount of chocolate animal keepers would put in her milk. Milo belongs to a pretty recently identified species, the northern yellow-cheeked gibbons, which can only be assessed using genetics and singing patterns in adults. This species are at high risk of imminent extinction due to heavy hunting, predominantly for the pet trade. However, with your support can make a world of difference for the future of Milo and the all other members of her species.

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